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Farm-Fresh Eggs are in high demand right now with store prices skyrocketing. People are turning to their chicken-keeping neighbors for food instead of choosing the convenience of the grocery store. This is a great thing! However, many people struggle to eat fresh eggs because they have been led to believe that these eggs are not safe for consumption. So today, we will dig into the question- “Are Farm-Fresh Eggs Safe to Eat?”

Are Farm-Fresh Eggs Safe to Eat?

Short answer- yes! 

Longer answer- It can depend on a few different variables that hinge on the specific chicken keeper.

Let’s talk about these variables and the differences between farm-fresh and store-bought eggs. 

Farm-Fresh Eggs are Different than Store-Bought Eggs

What makes eggs straight from the farm different than the eggs that you can purchase at the grocery store?

1. Age

The eggs that you find sitting in a grocery store refrigerator are between 6 weeks and 2 months old. While eggs sold by your local farmer can last that long (even longer when stored properly), he/she usually won’t sell them at that age. 

2. Nutrient Content

Farm-fresh eggs have been shown to contain less cholesterol, more vitamins & nutrients, and much more Omega 3 fatty acids than typical store-bought eggs. The nutritional value of an egg is related to the diet of the bird (think solely pellet-fed vs. homemade feed vs. free-range) so this factor can vary from one farm to the next. 

3. Protective Coating

Most eggs sold straight from the farm still have the bloom intact. Bloom is a protective coating that the hen covers her egg in before she lays it. Eggs sold in grocery store refrigerators have had this bloom removed so bacteria can freely enter through the pores in the shell.

farm fresh eggs in basket :: Are Farm Fresh Eggs Safe for Consumption?

Factors that Affect Egg Safety

Eggs from backyard chickens are safe to eat when the birds are healthy, the coop is clean, the eggs have an intact bloom, and they are handled properly. It is a good idea to get to know the farmer/homesteader you buy eggs from (and use good practices if you are selling eggs).

Be aware that many chicken owners do not allow on-site tours of their coops due to biosecurity issues. However, they should be willing to tell you about their practices.

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